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Is Your Conscience Condemning You? What exactly is your conscience? What role does it play in your life? And does it help or hurt you? In Who Told You That You Were Naked? Andrew Wommack answers these questions and more as he outlines how the conscience affects us. Andrew shares how the vast majority of Christians don’t understand how the conscience operates. If they did, they would no longer struggle with the fear, shame, guilt, and doubt that keep them from God’s best. As you learn about your conscience, you’ll learn how to walk in greater intimacy with Jesus, how to pray with boldness and confidence, how to receive God’s promises, and how to break free from fear and doubt once and for all.
In Rebecca Cantrell's A City of Broken Glass, journalist Hannah Vogel is in Poland with her son Anton to cover the 1938 St. Martin festival when she hears that 12,000 Polish Jews have been deported from Germany. Hannah drops everything to get the story on the refugees, and walks directly into danger. Kidnapped by the SS, and driven across the German border, Hannah is rescued by Anton and her lover, Lars Lang, who she had presumed dead two years before. Hannah doesn't know if she can trust Lars again, with her heart or with her life, but she has little choice. Injured in the escape attempt and wanted by the Gestapo, Hannah and Anton are trapped with Lars in Berlin. While Hannah works on an exit strategy, she helps to search for Ruth, the missing toddler of her Jewish friend Paul, who was disappeared during the deportation. Trapped in Nazi Germany with her son just days before Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, Hannah knows the dangers of staying any longer than needed. But she can't turn her back on this one little girl, even if it plunges her and her family into danger. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Kasalobi was born in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A french speaking country. He became a teacher at Boboto college after graduating from IPN, the national school of pedagogy in Kinshasa. As streets photographer, he made enough money to put himself back in school at ISC, an accounting college. That diploma led him to find a night job at Kinshasa Ndolo airport, there he started taking flying lessons with his boss' Cessna 150. The political situation in his native Congo obliged him to seek for asylum in the United States. That trip allowed him to accumulated flying hours at Acme school of Aeronautics at Meacham Field airport, in Fort Worth Texas. He later took his aviation ground school and his aviation technology at Mountain View College in Dallas Texas where he also studied correspondence, writing and reading. That helped him to become a reporter and DJ on the African Ambiance show at KNON radio, 89.3 FM. As one of the representatives of Congolese Community of Dallas and Fort Worth, Kasalobi co-wrote the community by-law and created l' Africana, a Congolese driving school. He lives in Hurst Texas and loves to travel, reason why he graduated from Swift University, a Phoenix Arizona transportation company at Lancaster Texas. Including Mexico and Canada, he is a US 48 states Swift truck driver. Kasalobi is an active internet Congolese political analyst and a full time writer.
Why do American husbands come home from work too exhausted to interact with their families? When did a healthy quest for prosperity become a twisted game no one can win? How did BlackBerries and internet porn become more interesting to men than their flesh-and-blood spouses? Shmuley Boteach has made a great study of how families live today—both in his work as a rabbi privately and as host of TLC's "Shalom in the Home". He's discovered a disturbing common thread in the families he meets: men responding to the pressure of competition in their work lives by turning away from their loved ones. In a world that judges men by the size of their paychecks and the wattage of their fame, it's all too easy to lose sight of what is truly valuable in life. Men who consider themselves failures and don't love themselves turn into stressed-out dads, distracted husbands and miserable human beings. For these men, alcohol, the internet and sporting events serve as numbing stand-ins for read life. In THE BROKEN AMERICAN MALE, Boteach doesn't just outline the problems facing marriages and nuclear families. He also offers practical, inspiring solutions, showing how wives can reach out to their husbands, helping them become heroes again to their own families.
New York Times Bestseller: Sweeping from the 1850s through the early 1920s, this towering family saga examines the price of ambition and power. Joseph Francis Xavier Armagh is twelve years old when he gets his first glimpse of the promised land of America through a dirty porthole in steerage on an Irish immigrant ship. His long voyage, dogged by tragedy, ends not in the great city of New York but in the bigoted, small town of Winfield, Pennsylvania, where his younger brother, Sean, and his infant sister, Regina, are sent to an orphanage. Joseph toils at whatever work will pay a living wage and plans for the day he can take his siblings away from St. Agnes’s Orphanage and make a home for them all. Joseph’s journey will catapult him to the highest echelons of power and grant him entry into the most elite political circles. Even as misfortune continues to follow the Armagh family like an ancient curse, Joseph takes his revenge against the uncaring world that once took everything from him. He orchestrates his eldest son Rory’s political ascent from the offspring of an Irish immigrant to US senator. And Joseph will settle for nothing less than the pinnacle of glory: seeing his boy crowned the first Catholic president of the United States. Spanning seventy years, Captains and the Kings, which was adapted into an eight-part television miniseries, is Taylor Caldwell’s masterpiece about nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America, and the grit, ambition, fortitude, and sheer hubris it takes for an immigrant to survive and thrive in a dynamic new land.
James Joseph Donovan stares out his own window, watching as the rain soaks Manhattan and puts a damper on his thirty-ninth birthday. J.J. Donovan is a private consultant - an expert people turn to when they've run out of options. Before the day is out, Janet Fein, a social worker friend, will ask Donovan to help a little boy named Clifford Brice. Clifford's mother Ruby - a prostitute and a heroin addict - has been brutally murdered. The police have a suspect in custody, but Janet and Clifford don't think it's the right man. The police don't seem to care. Janet wants Donovan and his eccentric partner, Doctor Boris Koulomzin, to find out the truth. Neither man can abandon the bright young boy. As they are formulating a plan, there is a second murder... and an attempt on Clifford himself. Donovan finds himself going undercover at a dank manufacturing plant in Brooklyn, where the rats, the criminals, and the immigrant laborers all struggle to make ends meet. It is a place where the people, like the machines, are broken. In this place, there is little room for repair or redemption, but Donovan pushes on. In the process, he and Boris expose a fraud, catch a murderer, and manage to blow up the better part of a city block. Broken Machines is a gritty mystery in the tradition of Robert Parker and Elmore Leonard.
First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

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