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On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther posted his ninety-five theses on the castle church door in Wittenberg. More than any other event, this has the best claim to be the starting gun that set the Reformation in motion. Five hundred years later, the Reformation still has important things to say. In this clear, incisive and accessible survey, Michael Reeves and Tim Chester show how the Reformation helps us answer questions like: How do we know what’s true? Can we truly know God? How does God speak? What’s wrong with us? How can we be saved? Who am I? That many people today find the Reformation strange and remote exposes our preoccupation with this material world and this momentary life. If there is a world beyond this world, and a life beyond this life, then it doesn’t seem to matter very much to us. At its heart, the Reformation was a dispute about how we know God and how we can be right with him. At stake was our eternal future - and it still is.
"Examines the origins of the Protestant Reformation and explains why some churches continue to dissent from Roman Catholicism"--
Historians and theologians alike have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations (or “solas”) that distinguished the movement from other expressions of the Christian faith. Five hundred years later, we live in a different time with fresh challenges to our faith. Yet these rallying cries of the Reformation continue to speak to us, addressing a wide range of contemporary issues. The Five Solas series will help you understand the historical and biblical context of the five solas and how to live out the relevance of Reformation theology today. In God’s Word Alone—The Authority of Scripture, scholar and pastor Matthew Barrett looks at the historical and biblical roots of the doctrine that Scripture alone is the final and decisive authority for God’s people. He examines the development of this theme in the Reformation and traces the crisis that followed resulting in a shift away from the authority of Scripture. Barrett shows that we need to recover a robust doctrine of Scripture’s authority in the face of today’s challenges and why a solid doctrinal foundation built on God’s Word is the best hope for the future of the church.
David Monge believes that many modern Christians no longer think carefully about scripture and tradition, because they don't believe it is essential to their faith -- and, he says, that's strikingly similar to the prevailing situation which confronted Martin Luther 500 years ago. An excellent introduction for laypersons, Life-Changing Faith For Today examines Luther's thought to discover how relevant it remains to Christians today -- and why it is important to all people of faith, whatever their denominational background. Very simply said, the core of his message is that we do not choose God, but He chooses us. Despite our unworthiness, salvation is ours because God loves us beyond all human comprehension. And that's why we need to rediscover Martin Luther -- since his theology is solidly rooted in both the Bible and human reality, it points us back to a radically authentic Christian faith. Monge is correct: teaching justification by faith is concentrating on a rather simple reality that gets blurred and muddied not because we who hear it are stupid but because we like to hang on to our own efforts and achievements, and these compromise the direct address of a justifying God to our situation. That is why he wrote this book... to reach out to those who welcome growth, who have curiosity, who wish to grow in faith, and want to use Luther's life and teaching as a prism through which to view the Christian reality. (from the Foreword) Martin E. Marty Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus The University of Chicago David J. Monge is currently the pastor of Newport Harbor Lutheran Church in Newport Beach, California, and has also pastored congregations in Minnesota and North Dakota. He is the author of three other books and the editor of eight more, and has published numerous articles and book reviews in Word & World, Dialog, and The Augsburg Publishing House Newsletter.
Historians and theologians have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations, often referred to as the ‘solas’: sola scriptura, solus Christus, sola gratia, sola fide, and soli Deo gloria. These five statements summarize much of what the Reformation was about, and they distinguish Protestantism from other expressions of the Christian faith. Protestants place ultimate and final authority in the Scriptures, acknowledge the work of Christ alone as sufficient for redemption, recognize that salvation is by grace alone through faith alone, and seek to do all things for God’s glory. In Faith Alone – The Doctrine of Justification renowned biblical scholar Thomas Schreiner looks at the historical and biblical roots of the doctrine of justification. He summarizes the history of the doctrine, looking at the early church and the writings of several of the Reformers. Then, he turns his attention to the Scriptures and walks readers through an examination of the key texts in the Old and New Testament. He discusses whether justification is transformative or forensic and introduces readers to some of the contemporary challenges to the Reformation teaching of sola fide, with particular attention to the new perspective on Paul. Five hundred years after the Reformation, the doctrine of justification by faith alone still needs to be understood and proclaimed. In Faith Alone you will learn how the rallying cry of “sola fide” is rooted in the Scriptures and how to apply this sola in a fresh way in light of many contemporary challenges.
Historians and theologians alike have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations (or “solas”) that distinguished the movement from other expressions of the Christian faith. Five hundred years later, we live in a different time with fresh challenges to our faith. Yet these rallying cries of the Reformation continue to speak to us, addressing a wide range of contemporary issues. The Five Solas series will help you understand the historical and biblical context of the five solas and how to live out the relevance of Reformation theology today. In Christ Alone, Stephen Wellum considers Christ’s singular uniqueness and significance biblically, historically, and today, in our pluralistic and postmodern age. He examines the historical roots of the doctrine, especially in the Reformation era, and then shows how the uniqueness of Christ has come under specific attack today. Then, he walks us through the storyline of Scripture, from Christ’s unique identity and work as prophet, priest, and king, to the application of his work to believers and our covenantal union with him to show that apart from Christ there is no salvation. Wellum shows that we must recover a robust biblical and theological doctrine of Christ’s person and work in the face of today’s challenges and explains why a fresh appraisal of the Reformation understanding of Christ alone is needed today.
Study guide for Reformation Truths: Gospel Clarity for Our Time includes lesson objectives, message outline, study questions, and discussion questions. Suitable for individual or group study.
Too often, the Reformers and their doctrines have been caricatured, misrepresented or misappropriated in the service of agendas they would never have recognized, let alone endorsed. Happily, there has been a great deal of fine scholarship in recent years that has exploded some of these myths, but it has not always been accessible to non-specialists. The intention of Celebrating the Reformation is that Christians today will find new cause to rejoice in what God did in the sixteenth century through weak and fallible men and women. These people sought, in their own context, to submit themselves to the word of God and lead his people in a godly and faithful response to the gospel of grace. Three sections deal with the chief Reformers, key doctrines and the Reformation in retrospect. Each contribution seeks to connect its subject to the present, making clear its relevance for today. The Reformation is not a dead movement but a living legacy that can still capture the imagination and encourage men and women in their own Christian discipleship. The contributors are Andrew Bain, Colin R. Bale, Rhys S. Bezzant, Gerald Bray, Martin Foord, David A. Höhne, Chase Kuhn, Andrew Leslie, Edward Loane, John McClean, Joe Mock, Michael J. Ovey, Tim Patrick, Mark D. Thompson, Stephen Tong, Jane Tooher and Dean Zweck.
Historians and theologians alike have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were the five solas: sola scriptura, solus Christus, sola gratia, sola fide, and soli Deo gloria. These five solas do not merely summarize what the Reformation was all about but have served to distinguish Protestantism ever since. They set Protestants apart in a unique way as those who place ultimate and final authority in the Scriptures, acknowledge the work of Christ alone as sufficient for redemption, recognize that salvation is by grace alone through faith alone, and seek to not only give God all of the glory but to do all things vocationally for his glory. 2017 will mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. And yet, even in the twenty-first century we need the Reformation more than ever. As James Montgomery Boice said not long ago, while the Puritans sought to carry on the Reformation, today “we barely have one to carry on, and many have even forgotten what that great spiritual revolution was all about.” Therefore, we “need to go back and start again at the very beginning. We need another Reformation.”[1] In short, it is crucial not only to remember what the solas of the Reformation were all about, but also to apply these solas in a fresh way in light of many contemporary challenges. [1]James Montgomery Boice, “Preface,” in Here We Stand: A Call from Confessing Evangelicals (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1996), 12.
Why Victorian Literature Still Matters is a passionatedefense of Victorian literature’s enduring impact andimportance for readers interested in the relationship betweenliterature and life, reading and thinking. Explores the prominence of Victorian literature forcontemporary readers and academics, through the author’sunique insight into why it is still important today Provides new frames of interpretation for key Victorian worksof literature and close readings of important texts Argues for a new engagement with Victorian literature, fromgeneral readers and scholars alike Seeks to remove Victorian literature from an entrenched set ofvalues, traditions and perspectives - demonstrating how vital andresonant it is for modern literary and cultural analysis
Captivated: Hearing God’s Word (Keswick Year Book 2017) We hear thousands of words every day, all vying for our attention. But what about God’s word? The great reformer Martin Luther famously declared, ‘My conscience is captive to the Word of God’. What about us? What importance do we give to listening to God’s word and letting it shape our lives? The 2017 Convention explored these questions, encouraging us to be captivated by God’s word so that, by his Spirit, we’d be transformed into Christ’s likeness, ready to serve him passionately wherever he’s placed us. This Year Book includes a selection of talks given during the three weeks of Convention: Bible teaching from Alistair Begg, Michael Reeves, Daniel Strange, Andy Prime, Tim Chester, Roger Simpson, Steve Midgley and Martin Salter to help you hear and obey God’s word.
Discover why the fundamentals of the Reformation still matter today Why do people get so excited about a bunch of Latin phrases, that some guys in Europe came up with 500 years ago? Sure, those five Latin phrases have defined Protestantism for those 500 years, but why do they matter today? To my church? For my life? What’s the big deal about all these solas anyway? These ones: Sola scriptura-Scripture alone Sola fide-Faith alone Sola gratia-grace alone Solus Christus-Christ alone Soli Dei Gloria-To the glory of God alone? Sola is a winsome, inspiring introduction to these five pillars of the Reformation, showing not just what they are but why they’re important for the Christian life today. Edited and compiled by Jason Allen, Sola will illuminate these core truths that have been reforming the church all along. And it may just get you excited about nerdy Latin phrases too.
Historians and theologians have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations, often referred to as the ‘solas’: sola scriptura, solus Christus, sola gratia, sola fide, and soli Deo gloria. These five statements summarize much of what the Reformation was about, and they distinguish Protestantism from other expressions of the Christian faith. Protestants place ultimate and final authority in the Scriptures, acknowledge the work of Christ alone as sufficient for redemption, recognize that salvation is by grace alone through faith alone, and seek to do all things for God’s glory. In God’s Glory Alone—The Majestic Heart of Christian Faith and Life, renowned scholar David VanDrunen looks at the historical and biblical roots of the idea that all glory belongs to God alone. He examines the development of this theme in the Reformation, in subsequent Reformed theology and confessions, and in contemporary theologians who continue to be inspired by the conviction that all glory belongs to God. Then he turns to the biblical story of God's glory, beginning with the pillar of cloud and fire revealed to Israel, continuing through the incarnation, death, and exaltation of the Lord Jesus Christ, and culminating in Christ's Second Coming and the glorification of his people. In light of these wonderful biblical themes he concludes by addressing several of today's great cultural challenges and temptations—such as distraction and narcissism—and reflecting on how commitment to God's glory alone fortifies us to live godly lives in this present evil age.
A thorough analysis of the Reformation, examining its roots through its greater European influences and focusing on what it meant to the individual Christian of that day There are many sound histories of the Reformation in the old style with its preference for ideas and theologians. Taking a new approach, this guide shows how it came to the individual Christian and what it meant. It analyzes whether--and why--Reformation teaching was or was not accepted, and looks at how it changed lives--with particular reference to the parish church, belief, and commitment. The author focuses largely on Britain but does not ignore European experience, and in the second part of the book looks at questions such as Why was there a reformation? How did it happen? What did it achieve? and Does it matter?
Offers a missional reflection on the book of 1 Peter as well as practical ideas for churches to engage those who are unchurched in an increasingly post-Christian context.
The Reformation was a seismic event in history, whose consequences are still working themselves out in Europe and across the world. The protests against the marketing of indulgences staged by the German monk Martin Luther in 1517 belonged to a long-standing pattern of calls for internal reform and renewal in the Christian Church. But they rapidly took a radical and unexpected turn, engulfing first Germany and then Europe as a whole in furious arguments about how God's will was to be 'saved'. However, these debates did not remain confined to a narrow sphere of theology. They came to reshape politics and international relations; social, cultural, and artistic developments; relations between the sexes; and the patterns and performances of everyday life. They were also the stimulus for Christianity's transformation into a truly global religion, as agents of the Roman Catholic Church sought to compensate for losses in Europe with new conversions in Asia and the Americas. Covering both Protestant and Catholic reform movements, in Europe and across the wider world, this beautifully illustrated volume tells the story of the Reformation from its immediate, explosive beginnings, through to its profound longer-term consequences and legacy for the modern world. The story is not one of an inevitable triumph of liberty over oppression, enlightenment over ignorance. Rather, it tells how a multitude of rival groups and individuals, with or without the support of political power, strove after visions of 'reform'. And how, in spite of themselves, they laid the foundations for the plural and conflicted world we now inhabit.
In this powerful exploration of the significance of martyrdom today, Catherine Pepinster looks at the lives of over a dozen martyrs, past and present, to consider how ideas about giving up your life for your faith have changed over the centuries, and especially the way they often embody the clash between religion and politics.
The title, Rediscovered Joy, derives from Galatians 4:15 (NLT). The Galatians had lost the joy of God’s blessing because they had departed from the truths of the gospel. The Reformation - and the book - is an invitation to rediscover the joy of the gospel. Despite the common claim that the Reformation is either out-dated or divisive, its rediscovery of the apostolic message was a rediscovery of joy - a message that is as relevant today as it was 500 years ago and 2,000 years ago. The book will be different to Why the Reformation Still Matters as it will be much lighter with more focus on biblical exposition and pastoral application. Contents 1. How to hear God’s voice – Galatians 1 Reformation link: Scripture alone 2. How to win God’s approval – Galatians 2 Reformation link: justification by faith alone through Christ alone 3. How to recognise God’s people – Galatians 3 & 4:21-31 Reformation link: the marks of a true church 4. How to enjoy God’s love – Galatians 4 Reformation link: the work of the Spirit 5. How to do God’s will – Galatians 5-6 Reformation link: gospel virtue
Since the sixteenth century, the Protestant tradition has been divided. The Reformed and Lutheran reformations, though both committed to the doctrine of the sinners justification by faith alone, split over Zwingli and Luther's disagreement over the nature of the Lord's Supper. Since that time, the Reformed and Lutheran traditions have developed their own theological convictions, and continue to disagree with one another. It is incumbent upon students of the reformation, in the Lutheran and Reformed traditions, to come to an understanding of what these differences are, and why they matter. In The Great Divide: A Lutheran Evaluation of Reformed Theology, Jordan Cooper examines these differences from a Lutheran perspective. While seeking to help both sides come to a more nuanced understanding of one another, and writing in an irenic tone, Cooper contends that these differences do still matter. Throughout the work, Cooper engages with Reformed writers, both contemporary and old, and demonstrates that the Lutheran tradition is more consistent with the teachings of Scripture than the Reformed.

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