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A chronological survey of the role and experience of women in American history, Women and the Making of America examines the issue of power in women's lives and women's history. Examining relationships between men and women as well as the diverse experiences of different women, the book explores how women were central to the making of America's history.
How did powder and paint, once scorned as immoral, become indispensable to millions of respectable women? How did a "kitchen physic," as homemade cosmetics were once called, become a multibillion-dollar industry? And how did men finally take over that rarest of institutions, a woman's business? In Hope in a Jar, historian Kathy Peiss gives us the first full-scale social history of America's beauty culture, from the buttermilk and rice powder recommended by Victorian recipe books to the mass-produced products of our contemporary consumer age. She shows how women, far from being pawns and victims, used makeup to declare their freedom, identity, and sexual allure as they flocked to enter public life. And she highlights the leading role of white and black women—Helena Rubenstein and Annie Turnbo Malone, Elizabeth Arden and Madame C. J. Walker—in shaping a unique industry that relied less on advertising than on women's customs of visiting and conversation. Replete with the voices and experiences of ordinary women, Hope in a Jar is a richly textured account of the ways women created the cosmetics industry and cosmetics created the modern woman.
"Making the "America of Art" demonstrates that beginning in the 1850s, women writers challenged the terms of the Scottish Common Sense philosophy, which had made artistic endeavors acceptable in the new Republic by subordinating aesthetic motivation to moral and educational goals. Harriet Beecher Stowe and Augusta Jane Evans drew on Ruskin to argue for the creation of a religiously based national aesthetic. In the postbellum years Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Constance Fenimore Woolson continued the process in a series of writings that revolved around three central areas of concern: the place of the popular in the realm of high art; the role of the genius; and the legacy of the Civil War." "Sofer significantly revises the history of 19th-century American women's authorship by detailing the gradual process that produced women writers wholly identified with literary high culture at the century's end."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
The transformation of a house into a home has been in our culture a traditional task of women. The articles examine this process as they reflected the role of American middle-class women as homemakers in the years 1840–1940.
MAKING AMERICA: A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, BRIEF FIFTH EDITION, presents history as a dynamic process shaped by human expectations, difficult choices, and often the surprising consequences. With this focus on history as a process, MAKING AMERICA encourages students to think historically and to develop into citizens who value the past. The clear chronology, straightforward narrative, and strong thematic structure emphasize communication over intimidation, and appeal to students of varied learning levels. The Brief Fifth Edition retains a hallmark feature of the MAKING AMERICA program: pedagogical tools that allow students to master complex material and enable them to develop analytical skills. Every chapter has chapter outlines, chronologies, focus questions, and in-text glossaries to provide guidance throughout the text. A new feature called Investigating America gets to the heart of learning history: reading and analyzing primary sources. The text’s new open, inviting design allows students to access and use pedagogy to improve learning. Available in the following split options: MAKING AMERICA, Brief Fifth Edition (Chapters 1-30), ISBN: 978-0-618-47139-3; Volume I: To 1877 (Chapters 1-15), ISBN: 978-0-618-47140-9; Volume II: Since 1865 (Chapters 15-30), ISBN: 978-0-618-47141-6. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Shaped with a clear political chronology, MAKING AMERICA reflects the variety of individual experiences and cultures that comprise American society. The book's clear and helpful presentation speaks directly to students, sparking their curiosity and inviting them to “do history” as well as read about it. For instructors whose classrooms mirror the diversity of today's college students, the strongly chronological narrative, together with visuals and an integrated program of learning and teaching aids, makes the historical content vivid and comprehensible to students at all levels of preparedness. Available in the following split options: MAKING AMERICA, Seventh Edition (Chapters 1-29), ISBN: 978-1-285-19479-0; Volume I: To 1877 (Chapters 1-15), ISBN: 978-1-285-19480-6; Volume II: Since 1865 (Chapters 15-29), ISBN: 978-1-285-19481-3. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Drawing on war propaganda, popular advertising, voluminous government records, and hundreds of letters and other accounts written by women in the 1940s, Melissa A. McEuen examines how extensively women's bodies and minds became "battlegrounds" in the U.S. fight for victory in World War II. Women were led to believe that the nation's success depended on their efforts--not just on factory floors, but at their dressing tables, bathroom sinks, and laundry rooms. They were to fill their arsenals with lipstick, nail polish, creams, and cleansers in their battles to meet the standards of ideal womanhood touted in magazines, newspapers, billboards, posters, pamphlets and in the rapidly expanding pinup genre. Scrutinized and sexualized in new ways, women understood that their faces, clothes, and comportment would indicate how seriously they took their responsibilities as citizens. McEuen also shows that the wartime rhetoric of freedom, democracy, and postwar opportunity coexisted uneasily with the realities of a racially stratified society. The context of war created and reinforced whiteness, and McEuen explores how African Americans grappled with whiteness as representing the true American identity. Using perspectives of cultural studies and feminist theory, Making War, Making Women offers a broad look at how women on the American home front grappled with a political culture that used their bodies in service of the war effort.
This groundbreaking reference work presents more than 100 articles by 98 high-profile interdisciplinary scholars, covering all aspects of girls' roles in American society, past and present.
In this richly interdisciplinary work twenty-eight of the nation's leading critics and scholars offer a comprehensive exploration of American society and culture. Each outstanding in his or her own field, the contributors address "America" from a diversit
A sweeping review of the role of women within the American military from the colonial period to the present day. * An extensive bibliography offers additional reading and research opportunities * Accessibly written essays introduce the thematic developments of each major conflict in American history * Supporting photographs and illustrations depict key female figures * An informative overview in the frontmatter provides historical context to women's roles in the military
If 1776 heralds America's Birth of the Nation, so, too, it witnesses the rise of a matching, and overlapping, American Literature. For between the 1770s and the 1820s American writing moves on from the ancestral Puritanism of New England and Virginia - though not, as yet, into the American Renaissance so strikingly called for by Ralph Waldo Emerson. Even so, the concourse of voices which arise in this period, that is between (and including) Benjamin Franklin and James Fenimore Cooper, mark both a key transitional literary generation and yet one all too easily passed over in its own imaginative right. This collection of fifteen specially commissioned essays seeks to establish new bearings, a revision of one of the key political and literary eras in American culture. Not only are Franklin and Cooper themselves carefully re-evaluated in the making of America's new literary republic, but figures like Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Philip Frencau, William Cullen Bryant, the other Alexander Hamilton, and the playwrights Royall Tyler and William Dunlop. Other essays take a more inclusive perspective, whether American epistolary fiction, a first generation of American women-authored fiction, the public discourse of The Federalist Papers, the rise of the American periodical, or the founding African-American generation of Phillis Wheatley. What unites all the essays is the common assumption that the making of America was as much a matter of creating its national literature; as the making of American literature was a matter of shaping a national identity.
Explores the relationship between copyright laws and women's writing in nineteenth-century America.
'Today, as I walked through Dublin city centre, I saw gay couples casually holding hands as they strolled, and kissing each other goodbye at bus stops in the late spring sunshine, and it seemed to me that all was changed, changed utterly ...' - From the Prologue, written three days after Ireland became the first country in the world to embrace marriage equality through popular vote Woman in the Making is the unforgettable story of how a little boy from a small Irish village in the west grew up to become Panti Bliss, Queen of Ireland and voice of a brave new nation embracing equality, all the colours of the rainbow and, most of all, a glamorous attitude.
Sarah Hicks Williams was the northern-born wife of an antebellum slaveholder. Rebecca Fraser traces her journey as she relocates to Clifton Grove, the Williams' slaveholding plantation, presenting her with complex dilemmas as she reconciled her new role as plantation mistress to the gender script she had been raised with in the North.
Presents a history of the status of women in nineteenth-century America, with an examination of their roles in marriage, family life, religion, and public life, and an analysis of their political and legal rights.
Lerner offers an entirely new framework for the study of women's history in America which avoids the traditional chronological periods by which U.S. history is most often studied and instead groups sources according to the life cycle of women, their roles in a male-defined society, in the workplace, in politics, and finally in the contemporary world where feminism is creating an altogether new consciousness.
First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
As the number of women candidates for office in the U.S. increases each election cycle, scholars are confronted with questions about the impact of their sex on their chances for success. Chief among these questions involves the influence of gender stereotypes on the decisions voters make in elections in which women run against men. While previous research has claimed that gender stereotypes undermine women's chances of success, Kathleen Dolan, through an original national survey of over 3000 adults, turns this conventional wisdom on its head. She demonstrates that voters do hold gendered attitudes, both positive and negative, about women candidates, but that these attitudes are not related to the political decisions they make. Instead, in deciding for whom to vote, people are influenced by traditional political forces, like political party and incumbency, regardless of the sex of the candidates. In the end, When Does Gender Matter? shows that women candidates win as often as do men and that partisan concerns trump gender every time.
Examines the symbols that defined perceptions of women during the late 1910s and 1920s and how they changed women's role in society.

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