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A number of years ago, Douglas Harper moved to northern New York to teach in a small college. Upon his arrival there his department chairman noted his eight-year-old Saab and said, "You'll be meeting Willie." Haper spent the next years establishing not only a working relationship but a friendship with Willie. In Working Knowledge, he introduces us to Willie, a mechanic and jack-of-all-trades. With this engaging and insightful profile—part biography, part ethnography, and part photo essay—Harper documents what Willie does and how he does it. Harper's dignified portrait captures a disappearing feature of modern life—the essential human factor in the world of work.
Corporate consultants examine the ways in which companies can best assess and utilize the intellectual value of their employees
Skilled workers of the early nineteenth century enjoyed a degree of professional independence because workplace knowledge and technical skill were their "property," or at least their attribute. In most sectors of today's economy, however, it is a foundational and widely accepted truth that businesses retain legal ownership of employee-generated intellectual property. In Working Knowledge, Catherine Fisk chronicles the legal and social transformations that led to the transfer of ownership of employee innovation from labor to management. This deeply contested development was won at the expense of workers' entrepreneurial independence and ultimately, Fisk argues, economic democracy. By reviewing judicial decisions and legal scholarship on all aspects of employee-generated intellectual property and combing the archives of major nineteenth-century intellectual property-producing companies--including DuPont, Rand McNally, and the American Tobacco Company--Fisk makes a highly technical area of law accessible to general readers while also addressing scholarly deficiencies in the histories of labor, intellectual property, and the business of technology.
This book describes and analyzes the current state of work-based learning in the US. It begins with a review of the history of work-based learning and its place in policy-making around school reform, which establishes the theoretical and empirical basis for the rest of the book. Based on over five years of research on work-based learning in high school and community college programs across the country, it explores the potential for using work-based learning as part of a broad education reform strategy. The authors emphasize the importance of situated learning in understanding work-based learning and in creating engaging and educational experiences for youth.
This book analyses the development of work based learning from a number of perspectives: critical, historical, philosophical, sociological and pedagogical. Its various contributors argue that work-based approaches contain much that is challenging to the university, and also much that could help to create new frameworks of learning and new roles for academics.
Working Knowledge: STEM Essentials for the 21st Century is designed to inspire a wide range of readers from high school and undergraduate students with an interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) to STEM teachers and those who wish to become teachers. Written by renowned scientist and teacher Dr. Karl Hess of the University of Illinois at Urbana, a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, the book presents a critical collection of timeless STEM concepts and connects them with contemporary research advances in addition to the needs of our daily lives. With an engaging and accessible style not requiring a formal background in STEM, Dr. Hess takes the reader on a journey from Euclidean Geometry and Cartesian Coordinates up through 21st Century scientific topics like the global positioning system, nanotechnology, and super-efficient alternative energy systems. Working Knowledge: STEM Essentials for the 21st Century at once serves as an almanac on the fascinating physical, chemical, quantitative features of the natural world and built environment, as well as a need-to-know list of topics for students, teachers, and parents interested in STEM education.
Skilled workers of the early nineteenth century enjoyed a degree of professional independence because workplace knowledge and technical skill were their ''property, '' or at least their attribute. In most sectors of today's economy, however, it is a foundational and widely accepted truth that businesses retain legal ownership of employee-generated intellectual property. In Working Knowledge, Catherine Fisk chronicles the legal and social transformations that led to the transfer of ownership of employee innovation from labor to management. This deeply contested development was won at the expense of workers' entrepreneurial independence and ultimately, Fisk argues, economic democracy. By reviewing judicial decisions and legal scholarship on all aspects of employee-generated intellectual property and combing the archives of major nineteenth-century intellectual property-producing companies--including DuPont, Rand McNally, and the American Tobacco Company--Fisk makes a highly technical area of law accessible to general readers while also addressing scholarly deficiencies in the histories of labor, intellectual property, and the business of technology

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