Download Free World History Of The Dance Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online World History Of The Dance and write the review.

A comprehensive study of the evolution of dance from the Stone Age, accompanied by a discussion of its motifs, movements and forms
Presenting seven examples from Africa, Southeast Asia, Melanesia and Oceania, this study attempts to further the anthropological understanding of dance's social significance and critical relevance by exploring it as a reflection of social forces.
History of Dance: An Interactive Arts Approachprovides an in-depth look at dance from the dawn of time through the 20th century. Using an investigative approach, this book presents the who, what, when, where, why, and how of dance history in relation to other arts and to historical, political, and social events. In so doing, this text provides a number of ways to create, perceive, and respond to the history of dance through integrated arts and technology. This study of dancers, dances, and dance works within an interactive arts, culture, and technology environment is supported by the National Standards in dance, arts education, social studies, and technology education. History of Dance: An Interactive Arts Approachhas four parts. Part Iexplains the tools used to capture dance from the past. Part IIbegins a chronological study of dance, beginning with its origins and moving through ancient civilizations and the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. Part IIIcovers dance from the 17th to the 20th century, including dance at court, dance from court to theater, romantic to classical ballet, and dance in the United States. Part IVfocuses on 20th-century American dance, highlighting influences on American ballet and modern dance as it emerged, matured, and evolved during that century. History of Dance: An Interactive Arts Approachincludes the following features: -Chapter outlines that present topics covered in each chapter -Opening scenarios to set the scene and introduce each time period -Explorations of dancers, choreographers, and other personalities -Explorations of the dances and significant choreography and dance literature of each time period -History Highlight boxes containing unusual facts, events, and details to bring history to life -History Trivia, providing insights into how dance relates to the history, art, and society of the time period -Web sites to encourage further exploration -Developing a Deeper Perspective sections that encourage students to use visual or aesthetic scanning, learn and perform period dances, observe and write performance reports, develop research projects and WebQuests (Internet-based research projects), and participate in other learning activities -Vocabulary terms at the end of each chapter Each chapter in parts II through IV provides an overview of the time period, including a time capsule and a historical and societal overview. Each chapter focuses on major dancers, choreographers, and personalities; dances of the period, including dance forms, dance designs, accompaniment, costuming, and performing spaces; and significant dance works and dance literature. The chapters also feature a series of eight experiential learning activities that help students dig deeper into the history of dance, dancers, and significant dance works and literature. These activities are presented as reproducible templates that include perceiving, creating, performing, writing, and presenting oral activities infused with technology. Teachers can use these activities as optional chapter assignments or as extended projects to help apply the information and to use technology and other integrated arts sources to make the history of dance more meaningful. History of Danceis an indispensable text for dance students who want to learn the history of dance and its relationship to other arts of the times using today's interactive technology.
This new collection of essays surveys the history of dance in an innovative and wide-ranging fashion. Editors Dils and Albright address the current dearth of comprehensive teaching material in the dance history field through the creation of a multifaceted, non-linear, yet well-structured and comprehensive survey of select moments in the development of both American and World dance. This book is illustrated with over 50 photographs, and would make an ideal text for undergraduate classes in dance ethnography, criticism or appreciation, as well as dance history—particularly those with a cross-cultural, contemporary, or an American focus. The reader is organized into four thematic sections which allow for varied and individualized course use: Thinking about Dance History: Theories and Practices, World Dance Traditions, America Dancing, and Contemporary Dance: Global Contexts. The editors have structured the readings with the understanding that contemporary theory has thoroughly questioned the discursive construction of history and the resultant canonization of certain dances, texts and points of view. The historical readings are presented in a way that encourages thoughtful analysis and allows the opportunity for critical engagement with the text. Ebook Edition Note: Ebook edition note: Five essays have been redacted, including “The Belly Dance: Ancient Ritual to Cabaret Performance,” by Shawna Helland; “Epitome of Korean Folk Dance”, by Lee Kyong-Hee; “Juba and American Minstrelsy,” by Marian Hannah Winter; “The Natural Body,” by Ann Daly; and “Butoh: ‘Twenty Years Ago We Were Crazy, Dirty, and Mad’,”by Bonnie Sue Stein. Eleven of the 41 illustrations in the book have also been redacted.
Now in paperback, Anthropology and the Dance is a lively, controversial examination and discussion of theories of dance by the pioneer of the anthropology of human movement. Drid Williams's definitive text is explicitly intended for graduate students in anthropology faced with the wide spectrum of theories of human movement, including the dance, sign language, martial arts, and rituals. With its groundbreaking approach to this previously unexamined field, however, Anthropology and the Dance brings the study of human movement to readers in fields such as philosophy, psychology, sociology, ethnomusicology, library science, physical education, history, music, linguistics, dance, and dance education. Williams examines subjects ranging from Aboriginal and African dances to the Royal Ballet, and makes a compelling case for moving beyond the Western view of the dance as mere entertainment, locating human movement firmly and irrefutably within the sphere of serious study. Anthropology and the Dance: Ten Lectures is the thoroughly rewritten second edition of Ten Lectures on Theories of the Dance (1991). Included are a glossary of terms, indexes and notes, an updated bibliography, and an appendix, "An Exercise in Applied Personal Anthropology."
Because dance materializes through and for people, because we learn to dance from others and often present dance to others, the moment of its transmission is one of dance's central and defining features. Valuing Dance looks at the occasion when dancing passes from one person to another as an act of exchange, one that is redolent with symbolic meanings, including those associated with its history and all the labor that has gone into its making. It examines two ways that dance can be exchanged, as commodity and as gift, reflecting on how each establishes dance's relative worth and merit differently. When and why do we give dance? Where and to whom do we sell it? How are such acts of exchange rationalized and justified? Valuing Dance poses these questions in order to contribute to a conversation around what dance is, what it does, and why it matters.
Expanded to include the latest discoveries in prehistoric art as well as the most recent developments in non-Western and modern art, this is an up-to-date and wide ranging history of art.

Best Books